Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies

Historical Significance

Founded in 1981, the University of Virginia's Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies is named in honor of native Virginian Carter Godwin Woodson. Born in 1875 in Buckingham County to parents who were formerly enslaved, Woodson went on to earn a Ph.D. in History at Harvard University in 1912. Woodson was only the second African-American to receive a Harvard doctorate, his predecessor being the eminent scholar W.E.B. DuBois.

Carter G. Woodson was instrumental in bringing professional recognition to the study of African-American history during a period when most historians held the opinion that African Americans were a people without history. He founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History in 1915 (later re-named the Association for the Study of African American Life and History) and its scholarly journal, The Journal of Negro History (now the Journal of African-American History), in 1916. Under his leadership, Negro History Week (now Black History Month) was inaugurated in the United States as an annual celebration of African-American achievement.

Physical Description

No Physical Description Available

Geographical and Contact Information

108 Minor Hall (near the Amphitheater), McCormick Road
Charlottesville, Virginia
22903
Phone: 434-924-3109
Fax: 434-924-8820

Cite this Page:

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, “Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies,” African American Historic Sites Database, accessed November 20, 2017, http://aahistoricsitesva.org/items/show/74.

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