Museum or Cultural Center

Site Type curated by: The African American Historic Sites Database Team

Museums & Cultural Centers in Virginia

Locations for Site Type

Historical Significance In August 1939 - more than 20 years before the sit-in at a Greensboro, N.C., lunch counter thrust the Civil Rights movement into the spotlight - five young black men held a sit-in at the whites-only public library at 717…

Historical Significance Carlyle House was built in 1752 by planter and merchant John Carlyle, one of the largest slaveholders in northern Virginia. A justice of the peace and original town trustee of Alexandria, Carlyle both imported slaves and…

Historical Significance The Frontier Culture Museum is a living history museum focusing on the lives of early American immigrants and the influence of their heritage on the American experience. Dating from the early 17th to the early 19th century,…

Historical Significance Avoca, originally called Green Level by the property's original owner, Colonel Charles Lynch (1736-1796), is part of a land grant given to Colonel Lynch's father by King George III in 1740. Colonel Charles Lynch was a planter…

Historical Significance Four enslaved men belonging to tavern owner Paul Thilman participated in Gabriel's Slave Rebellion of 1800. Led by an enslaved blacksmith, over one thousand men attempted to attack the armory in Richmond to arm themselves and…

Historical Significance J. Thomas Newsome (1869-1942), raised in Sussex County, was one of Newport News' most respected black civic leaders. Newsome attended Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institution (now Virginia State University), graduating in…

Historical Significance The Legacy Project was established in 1993 under the auspices of the Lynchburg NAACP and two years later was incorporated as an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. In 1997, Legacy bought a two-story Victorian house…

Historical Significance A National Register of Historic Places site and a Virginia Historic Landmark, Maymont is significant as an intact, ornamental estate representing the architecture, decorative arts, and landscape design typical of America's…

Historical Significance Meadow Farm is a plantation associated with the slave insurrection planned for August 30, 1800 by an enslaved blacksmith named Gabriel. On that day, Tom and Pharaoh, two enslaved men on the Meadow Farm, entered the office of…

Historical Significance In 1878, Judge J.D. Coles tried to use his authority to exclude blacks from serving as grand and petit jurors in the Pittsylvania County courthouse. Judge Coles was arrested and charged with a violation of the Civil Rights…

Historical Significance The Robert Robinson Library was the first public library built exclusively for African Americans in Alexandria. It was built in 1940 as a way of forestalling integration of the existing library on Queen Street, built just…

Historical Significance For more than 100 years, the Valentine Museum has collected, preserved, and interpreted the materials of the life and history of Richmond, Virginia. Major changing exhibitions at the Valentine focus on American urban and…

Historical Significance Opened in 1995, the Watson Reading Room is a non-circulating research library of African-American history and culture. It is named in honor of Charles and Laura Watson, African Americans who amassed large landholdings in…

Historical Significance The Yorktown Victory Center tells the story of the American Revolution from the beginning of colonial unrest to the formation of a new nation, with emphasis on the personal experiences of diverse people of the Revolutionary…